Wild Persistence

The poems in Wild Persistence often involve moments when the human and natural worlds intersect: a Sand-hill Crane dancing at the window of a grieving woman, a copperhead snake confronting a gardener, a billboard photo of a missing child slowly being eroded by weather and the passage of time. Although these poems mourn numerous losses, they celebrate the world in which such losses take place, turning for perspective to nature with its cyclical renewals and to the resilience of the human spirit.


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After Earth

Part elegy, part ode, part pastoral, part sci-fi, After Earth looks back through history in order to consider history’s end. Many of the poems are drawn from the concerns of a father for his children, from the impulse to record the Earth, to preserve what’s slipping away, and to heal, if poems can, the bifurcation of nature and civilization. Reveling in the ornate as well as the plain, these poems cultivate astonishment not in the promise of another world, but in the here and now, turning “what is wavering or tattered into permanence,” and praising all they can, as Auden says we must, “for being and for happening.”


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Studies In The Fantastic [#7]

Guest Editor’s Introduction: No More Room in Hell: Reanimation, Consumption, and Undead Media
By Sonia Lupher


Global Racial Capitalism and the Asian American Zombie in Ling Ma’s Severance
By Aanchal Saraf


#1BillionForThriller: Revival of “Dead” Content on YouTube
By Kelsey Cummings


Fungal Zombies and Tentacular Thinking: The Chthonic Mother in the Game The Last of Us
By Geneveive Newman


Pressing Rewind: New Encounters with Analog Memories in Ross Sutherland’s Stand By for Tape Back-Up
By Jordan Z. Adler


If the Goo Sticks: Streamlining Slime with Goosebumps on Canada’s YTV Network
By Pat Bonner


“Living Hell”: Fulci’s Eternal City
By Daniel Sacco


The Living Dead in Post-Soviet Cultural Consumption
By Denis Saltykov


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Tampa Review 57/58


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Studies In The Fantastic [#6]

“Transitional Gothic: Hammer’s Gothic Revival and New Horror”
By Adam Charles Hart

“Like Clockwork: French Automatons in Life and Literature”
By W. Bradley Holley

“The Politics of Precarity in William Gibson’s Bridge Trilogy”
By Bryan Yazell

“From The Day After to The 100: Nuclear Weapons on Television”
By Steven Holmes

“Creepy Atmospheres and Weird Narration in The OA”
By Steen Ledet Christiansen


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Tasting Like Gravity: Rondeaux and Other Poems

Tasting Like Gravity brings new poems from Florida’s poet laureate, Peter Meinke, with an emphasis on the roundeaux form. The book also includes a short essay on rondeaux by the poet and selected drawings by Jeanne Clark Meinke.


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Black Hole Factory

A black hole is a region of space-time with such strong gravitational effects that nothing—not even particles and electromagnetic radiation such as light—can escape from inside it. In Black Hole Factory, poet Eric Smith writes his way into and out of such holes with a commitment to the history and craftsmanship of the well-shaped poem. He compresses experience, intellect, and feeling within concentrated stanzas of compelling density. Even traditional rhyme and meter become sources of surprise and innovation in his hands. The book has poems that communicate impressive control, intellect, and wit—poems that cultivate ironic self-awareness and detachment on the part of both poet and reader. And then there are breakthrough moments giving up both irony and control in which poet and reader experience a kind of gravitational collapse powerful enough to deform and reshape space and time. In the end, Eric Smith has shaped a profound and accomplished manuscript of deep personal engagement graced by moving, open flights of lyricism.


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The Danahy Fiction Prize | Ten Years, Ten Stories

There is reason to celebrate as the Danahy Fiction Prize completes its first decade and moves forward. This collection of the first ten Danahy Prize stories seems to be one of the most appropriate ways to observe the milestone. It is a chance to showcase ten talented writers who deserve to be even more widely known. And it is a chance to recognize and thank Paul and Georgia Danahy for their generosity, cultural awareness, and commitment to literature and community. The ten stories collected here are presented in the order they were announced as winners, in addition to short biographical notes about each writer arranged alphabetically at the back of the book.


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What The Body Knows

After our argument, my beloved fled to the flea market. Upon returning, she said, “I still love you. Here’s a door.” Picture a storm door, heavy gauge aluminum, shrunk to 28 by 22 inches and attached to a frame—what she offered in lieu of a make-up kiss . . . . A shower is a door between clean and cleaner. Belief is a door you lay down in a graveyard whereby dead aunts climb out of the dirt. A bed at midday is a door between two people who touch and trade breaths and burn late and exit their bodies like vapor . . . . A cat is a door we keep around the house to remind us we once preferred the world of animals. Morning has come. My door, which is now our door, leans against the wall the way shadows lean into the next life. My cat passes through this practice portal to prove she is still here. I get down on all fours, a rehearsal. I have doors all over my body—open them.

—From “Doors” by Lance Larsen, in What the Body Knows

Lance Larsen’s poetry inhabits a surreal backyard, blooming with zucchini, peonies, hooves and bones, sheet music by Chopin, and God the Father, loping through a vineyard. In 2012, Larsen was named the Utah Poet Laureate, a post he describes as “a kind of itinerant preacher of the word (lower case), or a Johnny Appleseed of the literary artifact.” Fortunately, he has a gift for making words grow. His poems often begin with quick affirmatives (“True…. yes”), as if they first sprouted in casual back-porch conversations and then wheeled off into their own expanding lives. . . . There’s a slantwise echo of the garden in all of Larsen’s poetry. In its fascination with the natural world, both domestic and wild, there’s a longing to connect with the creation, with the other, and with God.


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Buddha’s Dog

Ira Sukrungruang’s Buddha’s Dog & Other Meditations charts one man’s journey toward emotional maturity, to a place of knowledge though not necessarily of comfort. These marvelous essays weather with heart and humor the tumultuous waters of cultural identity, body image, and mortality, to arrive at those bittersweet truths about our flawed yet spirited selves.


– Rigoberto González


Author of Autobiography of My Hungers

 

Subversive, sorrowful, tender, and sly, Buddha’s Dog & other Meditations is Ira Sukrungruang’s best book yet: a love song to bodies, both canine and human, imperfect and hungry to live.

– Paul Lisicky


Author of The Narrow Door: A Memoir of Friendship


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Tampa Review 55/56


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Studies In The Fantastic [#5]

The Quest for Female Empowerment in William Morris’s Late Prose Romances
By Weronika Łaszkiewicz


Bad Future: Real-Time Alternate History
By Andrew Frost


Love in the Time of the Zombie Contagion: A Girardian-Weilienne Reading of World War Z
By Duncan Reyburn


The Figure of the Gothic Body in the Fiction of Caitlín R. Kiernan
By James Goho


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Public Land

“The portraits, elegies, and landscapes in Public Land illuminate these pages with flashes of shadow and uncharted landscapes of electric, existential honesty. In tensile and subtle verse, Matt Sumpter deftly embraces the rhythms of language and emotional experience, gifting us a poetry that, like the forests our speaker turns and returns to, harbors the most ineffable of growth. This book is unflinchingly, deeply felt. It builds and changes under its own light like a flowering engine, ‘as if this ruin were a kind of rescue.’ This is vital, arresting work by a singular voice, and I know that I will turn and return to these poems in years to come.”
— Lo Kwa Mei-en


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Pioneer Days on Tampa’s Gulf Beaches

Though Spanish fishermen from Cuba camped on the key, and native Tocobaga Indians visited in an earlier era, the beaches were virtually unsettled when George Lizotte arrived. An early postcard of Lizotte on a fishing skiff shows the island’s only two structures. They were the home of original settler Captain Zephaniah Phillips and a tent erected by Lizotte to house workers building his Hotel Bonhomie. George Lizotte would figure prominently in the barrier islands’ history, both as an observer and participant. As an eyewitness to the events taking place, Lizotte gives a fascinating inside look at the Gulf beaches’ transformation from a primitive settlement to a major tourist destination.


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Tampa Review 54


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Light Into Bodies

Taken as a whole, Light into Bodies grapples with issues of identity, the fluid and evolving nature of identity, and how identity can be contextual. It explores individual identity and how that identity changes through time and influence. The book is divided into three parts. The first section inhabits the landscape of childhood, that of a biracial, multiethnic child as she grapples with understanding the world and her place in it based on what she sees and what she’s been taught. The second section moves from childhood and family-of-origin into the world of the adult: relationships, marriage, divorce, and expectations of identity and behavior based on relationship roles. The third section opens up to the larger world and identity in that world, societal expectations and assumptions with respect to identity, the concept of home, memory and time, origins and creation. Recurring juxtapositions of sometimes seemingly disparate things, such as science and religion, myth and math, East and West, coupled with a mix of various poetic forms and styles, strive to work against the declaration of a monolithic identity. The book ends with a nod to the idea that we are multi-dimensional with multiple identities, to the idea that identity is a personal journey and that we have a right and an obligation to identify our own selves.


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Love Nailed To The Doorpost

In Love Nailed to the Doorpost, Richard Chess offers poems and lyrical prose inspired and informed equally by the pleasures and pressures of everyday life and by sacred and secular texts ranging from Torah to Basho to Robert Creeley. This new work transports us from the biblical past to the present, from creation stories to stories of brotherly struggle to meditations on married and family love.
Love—that’s the thing, whether spontaneously arising or commanded, as it is, the commandment to love inscribed on parchment, rolled up and tucked into a small case, a mezuzah, and nailed to the doorpost of the house. You shall love: the challenges of fulfilling that commandment, and the joy and transformation one experiences when one does: that’s what Chess’s powerful new work explores.


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Studies In The Fantastic [#4]

How to Build a Transsexual Superman: Reading Superman’s Emergence Alongside Histories of Eugenic Science and Gender Confirmation Surgeries
By Dan Vena


How to Hack Lovecraft, Make Friends with His Monsters, and Hijack His Mythos: Reading Biology and Racism in Elizabeth Bear’s ‘Shoggoths in Bloom’
By Anthony Camara


Ghana-da’s Tall-Telling: Reframing History, Estranging Science, and Appropriating Indigenous Structures of Feeling
By Anwesha Maity


‘The Icy Bleakness of Things’: The Aesthetics of Decay in Thomas Ligotti’s ‘The Bungalow House’
By Chris Brawley


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Tampa Review 53


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The Expert Witness

This new collection of twenty-six stories includes eighteen hard-to-find gems and eight new tales from Flannery O’Connor Award Winner and Florida Poet Laureate Peter Meinke. Jeanne Clark Meinke has added two dozen new and selected drawings to form a collection sure to become a favorite.


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Tampa Review 51/52


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O Fortunate Floridian

S. T. Joshi and David E. Schultz, the leading scholars of Howard Phillips Lovecraft’s life and work, have assembled all of Lovecraft’s letters to his friend, Robert H. Barlow of DeLand, Florida, in this impressive volume. Though the two corresponded for only seven years, Lovecraft’s side of the exchange totals nearly 500 pages. The editors have annotated the letters exhaustively, clarifying hundreds of references to people, places, literary works, and history. Their long introduction provides the reader with the essential story of the friendship between Lovecraft and Barlow, and their relationships with friends and colleagues in the worlds of amateur journalism, fandom, pulp fiction, and others.

“What a book! As a young fan first acquiring works by Lovecraft in the 1960s I never dreamed that any such volume would or could be published. You can largely step into the shoes of Robert Hayward Barlow, if you wish, when you read this book. What a privilege!” – Kenneth W. Faig Jr. (The Fossil, January 2008)


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Separate Flights

Winner of the 2015 Anita Claire Scharf Award

Many of the poems in Separate Flights are about perspective: a child’s view of her neighborhood from the shifting altitudes of a small plane, the dying Keats looking out his window at life going on without him, a deadly hot air balloon crash that appears beautiful to a passenger flying far above it, Monet in his garden continuing to paint the willows within earshot of the German guns. In these poems birds appear both as part of nature and as messengers: the heron flying over a sick woman’s house, the goldfinch arriving as unexpectedly as an idea, the owl nesting in winter and calling forth spring. Whether their focus is nature or human consciousness, the poems in Separate Flights pay attention to the ways in which angle of vision alters our perceptions of the world.


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Among The Gorgons

Winner of the 2015 Tampa Review Prize for Poetry


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Black Anthem

This book of sonnets—wide-ranging in their investigations of the body, the psyche, metaphysical hunger and its place in human conflict—owes its emotional power to the speed and focus of small songs taking part in a larger conversation. In honor and defiance of tradition, these sonnets turn their gaze outward to ask, is not a song more elusive than our story about it? How might our limits quicken and deepen the question of values? Whatever the anthem, as Bond explores it, something of its music is ever larger than its message, its measures more measureless, its window more capacious than its frame. Paisley Rekdal, author of Animal Eye, says, “Black Anthem is beautiful, smart, and relentlessly probing. Anyone interested in the sonnet tradition must read it.”


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Studies In The Fantastic [#3]

With this third issue, Studies in the Fantastic welcomes readers to a reboot and revival of the journal. In the five years since the last issue, many new and exciting trends have arisen in popular culture and scholarship; in the box office, superheroes dominate, and popular franchises—including Star Wars, Jurassic Park, Terminator, and Mad Max—are having “reboots” of their own, Game of Thrones has renewed a popular interest in fantasy, and scholarship on popular culture proliferates in venues large and small

Studies in the Fantastic [#3] focuses on reboots, in keeping with a compelling contemporary trend and our own re-launch of the journal. Contributors to the issue tackle issues of adaptation, appropriation, and translation. That these topics are at the heart of current debates in literary and cultural studies speaks to the relevance of the fantastic to critical discourse; that this collection of essays is so diverse speaks to the breadth of scholarly approaches to the fantastic and gives great hope for the future of this field of study.

“The Terror of Translation: Ruins of the Translatio in The Castle of Otranto and Vathek
by Micheal Angelo Rumore

“Revolutionary Subjectivity in Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn Trilogy”
by Peter Melville

“Rebooting the Damsel: The Transformation of the Damsel Archetype in Spider-Man, Superman, and Batman Films from 1978-2014”
by Joseph Walderzak

“The Emerge(d)nt Weird Tale: A Genre Study”
by Todd Spaulding


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The Rich Mouse Compendium

The Rich Mouse Compendium includes a complete facsimile of the hand-printed letterpress edition; an introduction; complete facsimiles of two versions of J. J. Lankes’ original manuscript (one typed and one hand-written); notes on the discovery of those manuscripts; original, unpublished photographs and background materials on J. J. Lankes as artist and printer; photographs and background materials on Frederic W. Goudy and his design of the Village type; a J. J. Lankes chronology; and notes and essays on the making of the letterpress edition.

Set in a new digital version of Goudy’s Village type (the typeface used for printing the letterpress edition), it includes an introduction by Welford D. Taylor; essays by Richard Mathews, Robert Oldham, Will Ransom, and Joshua G. Steward; and a conversation with Parker Agelasto.


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Tampa Review 50

This year Tampa Review celebrates its fiftieth anniversary with this second of two anniversary issues. From a tiny seed, a surprising family tree has grown: from the mimeographed and stapled UT Poetry Review to today’s lithographed Tampa Review, printed in signatures and sewn into hardback covers. Rooted in the literary and artistic community of the Tampa Bay area, we have grown to be Florida’s oldest literary journal, in this issue renewing itself in partnership with one of the area’s newest cultural assets, the Two Red Roses Foundation.

We are proud of our traditions and our strong affinities with the American Arts and Crafts Movement. Its authentic spirit guides us as an independent, nonprofit publisher, dedicated to artistic standards rather than commercial values. In step with the Two Red Roses Foundation and its Museum of the American Arts and Crafts Movement, we rededicate ourselves to strive for and represent the highest aims of visual and literary arts and to practice in our craft the tangible ways of bringing these aims into daily relevance within the world.

Like the Arts and Crafts Movement that blurred and blended lines between decoration and utility, the literary texts in this issue explore a series of contrasts and connections—past/future, parent/child (especially father/son), poverty/wealth, cynicism/idealism—while refusing to treat them as binaries. The narrator of Isabella David’s Danahy Fiction Prize story is a young law student determined to reject simple dualisms, yet unable to abandon the lure of finely parsed sentences and legal profits for the indistinct goals of fine art. In “Greenhouse Statistics,” Poet Laureate of Florida Peter Meinke acknowledges the contradictions behind his decision to teach his children the ironically named survival skill of “the dead man’s float.”

Children represent the future, and their stories are more complicated than simple fairy tales, as we are reminded in “The Feral Children of Kabul” by J. Malcolm Garcia and in the deconstructed plot of “Hansel and Gretel” by D. J. Sheskin, in which a word game played by grown-ups adds ominous readings to a familiar text. Craig Cotter’s “Nickle Diner” shows a more ideal human moment—a welcome escape from loneliness through empathy and poetry. Together the contents of this fiftieth-anniversary issue transmit rich complexity. As Meinke suggests, while statistics prove the dangers of climate change and measure the threat of global war, we workers in arts and crafts must go on repairing and decorating our houses, teaching and cherishing our children—accepting the limited extent of our power, but nonetheless using it. The beautiful and useful! As Steve Kowit exhorts in his final poem: “Cherish! Cherish! That’s all I can tell you.”


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Cherish

How strange to be here at all
talking to you like this in a poem—
if only a moment our two psyches
touching.
—from “Passing Thru”

Steve Kowit’s poetry has been described as a “memorable exhilaration, a singular concentration of language, and a flow of razor-sharp images springing irrepressibly from the author’s humanity” (CHOICE). It is his humanity we celebrate in this, Steve’s last collection. Cherish: New and Selected Poems was receiving its final editorial touches by Steve when he passed away in April of 2015.

Steve Kowit—a poet, an editor, a teacher—was 2007 winner of the Tampa Review Prize for Poetry for his collection The First Noble Truth and author of other books of poems, including Lurid Confessions, The Dumbbell Nebula, and The Gods of Rapture. He was also author of the influential creative writing workshop text In the Palm of Your Hand: The Poet’s Portable Workshop.

“How fine to have in in our hands . . . the lucid, voluptuous, exuberant poems of Steve Kowit.” —Dorianne Laux


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Southside Buddhist

Carrying forward the themes and spirit of his previous memoir, Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy, and his book of poems, In Thailand It Is Night, Ira Sukrungruang brings humor, insight, and lyricism to his new collection of personal essays, Southside Buddhist. Here he cruises Chicago streets, treks Southern Illinois forests, wrestles with his ever-expanding body, and contemplates the complexities of the Thai immigrant life. He finds solace with his imaginary friend, Buddha; causes mischief with the boys in his working-class neighborhood; battles depression and suicide; and marries “the whitest woman in the world,” who teaches him to appreciate a world blessed by the absence of concrete, skyscrapers, and noise. This book searches for the truth of his memories, the truth of himself—a very Buddhist notion—while navigating the tricky terrains of urban and rural life with increasing awareness of what it means to be an immigrant son.


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Tampa Review 49

We are pleased to begin our fiftieth year by featuring selections from My Generation: Young Chinese Artists, an exhibition showcasing some of the new world-class artists who have emerged in China since 2000. This exhibition—a collaboration between the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, and the Tampa Museum of Art— offers stunning visual evidence that Florida is fully engaged in global cultural dialog. The show runs here June 7-September 28, 2014, before traveling to Oklahoma City Museum of Art, where it will be on view October 25, 2014-January 18, 2015. The works speak for themselves while bridging the country and spanning the globe.

The literary contents of TR49 reflect a new generation’s struggle with “Utopia”—as Qui Xiaofei visually depicts on the cover. Poet Zeina Hashem Beck also expresses it in her opening poem as she personifies a world “trying to tip over its pain.” Daniel Gabriel describes a utopian interlude in his 2009 visit to “Syria Before It All Went South.” By contrast, Malcolm Garcia struggles to find grounds for faith amidst horror and ruin in “Praying in Reyhanli.”
Less destructive but deeply troubling is the singing war started by Mrs. Mudd in Jill Birdsall’s “The Beer Garden,” where experiences that promise harmony become discordant when inflected by greed, ego, and nationalism. Poet Michael Hettich takes a higher view in “Certain Constellations,” in which attentiveness to the natural world affirms the possibility of harmony if “we might move into/the circle of its song.”
The issue concludes with struggles from our more recent past portrayed in Vincent Czyz’s “Straightsville,” set in the 1980s, mostly at a gay rally in Manhattan. The story’s narrator experiences a series of mutual misreadings that blur the cultural divide between New York and New Jersey, gay and straight, work week and weekend. Czyz’s story suggests, as does the speaker of Knute Skinner ’s poem “What I Have Assembled,” that selves are multiple, that they can be torn apart and reassembled in diverse ways, and that people and generations may be more alike than different.
Finally, reproductions from the Tampa Poetry Review of fifty years ago remind us how both our distant and recent pasts contain the cultural heritage and visionary struggles that create each new version of “my generation.”


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Sixty Years of Prints & Wood Engravings

Wood engraving and letterpress printing have proven to be more than passing hobbies for Spokane, Washington artist and craftsman Gale Mueller. Sixty Years of Prints & Wood Engravings collects the evidence to show what a substantial body of work can result from an activity one does for love rather than money. From early prints for Christmas cards in 1953 through the accomplished “Armadillo” wood engraving in 2013, Mueller’s touch conveys delight and insight in the scores of images he has rendered over a lifetime of work—work that continues on for this publication: a new cut, of “The Engraver” himself, was designed, engraved, and printed by the artist especially for this collection. Sixty Years of Prints & Wood Engravings reproduces over 125 prints, including 24 color reproductions of multicolor relief prints, with a Foreword by woodcut collector and J. J. Lankes scholar Welford D. Taylor; Afterword by letterpress printer Mike O’Conner.

“There is a distinctly personal dimension . . . at times humorous, occasionally whimsical but never inappropriate or gratuitous. It is his manner to observe the telling qualities of a subject, respect its uniqueness as he expresses it and then, often but not always, embellish it with a touch of his own unique essence . . . His work indicates that a human hand, guided by a human heart, has carved the design.” —from the Foreword, by Welford D. Taylor

Also available in a hand bound, limited edition that includes a signed frontispiece of “The Engraver” printed by the artist from the original block.


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Tampa Review 47/48

Every work of literary and visual art can be said to offer an experience of “augmented reality,” making us aware of hidden dimensions, perceptions, and truths about our world that heighten and enhance our understanding. This issue of Tampa Review, however, presents Augmented Reality for the first time in a digital mode. The cover art by Kendra Frorup includes a gateway to a virtual reality, and readers with the Aurasma app on an iPhone, iPad, or smart device can view the emptiness within that arch as a threshhold to moving images from Turks and Caicos in the Bahamas.
Augmented Reality is only one of many “firsts” in this double issue. It’s also the first time that we have highlighted our own University of Tampa art faculty as the featured artists for the issue. We don’t know why we didn’t think of it before, but now that it has finally occurred to us, it will not be the last time. It has always been part of our mission to connect Florida and the world, and our University of Tampa art faculty beautifully fit the pattern of local and global awareness.

One phrase that comes to mind with respect to the contents is “foreign and domestic,” a term pointing two ways that turns up in federal swearing-in ceremonies and in oaths of citizenship. It also resonates throughout this issue, from the homeland security of “A Family of Interest” in James Gordon Bennett’s Danahy Fiction Prize story to Martin Cloutier’s disturbing “World Brought Close,” with its images of need and vulnerability. Foreign and domestic explorations can stretch the boundaries of the worlds we know, and this issue probes both home and outer limits. Reality is continuously augmented in this issue, cover to cover, rolling out in unexpected directions and connections near and far—spokes on a wheel, cords and ties that bind, new ways of reading that open the doors of perception.


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Visitations

Winner of the Anita Claire Scharf Award

Robert Morgan describes John Bensko’s collection, Visitations, as “a book of portraits and voices, many voices, all of them vivid and memorable. Rivers speak, weeds speak, and figures from American history tell us their stories . . . Both the atrocities and glories of our world come to life in these poems of witness, lament, celebration, and the often painful mystery of love.”

In Visitations, Bensko pushes readers to enlarge their vision through imaginative leaps; his poems are visitations to multiple times and places, indwelling bodies and circumstances. He allows us to inhabit both sides of a war, to move from the Hudson River Valley to Mississippi, or to draw our souls through sheep, oxen, and shark; we are unmoored from time and place to explore what it means to be fully human.

“I sit back after reading one of these and have to catch my breath, a little shaken by encountering a poet whose instinct guides him straight to the heart of the matter . . . I rejoice that poetry this good is still being written,” writes Richard Tillinghast.


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Systems of Vanishing

Winner of the 2013 Tampa Review Prize for Poetry

Though the poems in Systems of Vanishing range widely in their content and form, the collection as a whole is grounded in its focus on the disappearances occurring all around us, all the time. Some of these disappearances are natural, organic vanishings that have always been central to life; others are unnatural, grief-inducing losses we are inflicting on the world—the vanishing of species, of beauties of all kinds, and of the rhythms by which we live most fully, replaced by noise and a lust for things. But Hettich’s poems are also infused with a profound gratitude for the pleasures and graces of his life—the amazing natural fecundity that surrounds him in his subtropical habitat, and the abiding love of family and friends. These poems explore not only the extraordinary variety and magnitude of loss, but also the great power of resilience and joy.

Chase Twitchell says of Hettich and Systems of Vanishing, “(His) authority, which is both modest and absolutely genuine, compels us to follow him into some wild what-ifs, which make for an exciting ride. His elegy for a lost daughter brought me to tears. The quiet magic of these poems is stunning and profound.”

Richard Blanco calls Systems of Vanishing Hettich’s “most profound and intricate collection to date.”


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Truth and Affection

Jeanne Clark Meinke is an artist with drawings in The New Yorker, Gourmet, Yankee, numerous other periodicals, and in her book Lines from Wildwood Lane. Peter Meinke is an author whose work has been published in The Atlantic, The New Yorker, The New Republic, Poetry, Tampa Review, seven books of the Pitt Poetry Series, and in two collections of fiction. He is Poet Laureate of St. Petersburg, Florida.  Together they deliver Truth and Affection in the “Poet’s Notebook” columns that have appeared in Creative Loafing over a period of more than six years. As David Warner writes in his foreword, it “is difficult to define, a tasty bouillabaisse of poetry, politics, and personal essay . . . winning hearts and minds of all ages . . . and a few awards along the way.”


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Absence & Presence

In her ninth book, and her second poetry collection with the University of Tampa Press, Lisa Steinman considers both the seen and the unseen as she “meditatively engages the ironies of being,” as poet Maxine Scates has beautifully phrased it.  Writer Alice Fulton observes that “In Absence & Presence, Lisa M. Steinman confronts the most unsparing aspects of existence with an intelligence that is nothing short of revelatory.”


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Dear Stranger

Poet Major Jackson refers to the poems in Jenny Browne’s newest collection as “angel-fisted lyrics,” and this evocative phrase captures both the tough and rapturous sides of her work. With poems of memory and narrative, thought and feeling, Jenny Browne has shaped another powerful book.

Poet and professor Stephen Burt of Harvard University writes, “Her poems retain the unpredictability not of a roulette wheel or a supernova, but of a quirky, wise friend in another city, one whose reactions surprise us even once we know her well enough to trust her well.”


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Tampa Review 45/46

Issue 45/46 of Tampa Review features the 2012 winner of the $1,000 Danahy Fiction Prize, “Scar” by Mark Krieger. The cover art is a photograph of the expansive room-sized installation art of Carol Mickett and Robert Stackhouse exhibited in the Selby Gallery of the Ringling College of Art and Design of Sarasota, Florida. Like their installations, much of the work in this issue explores phases of identity, considers the marks we leave upon the world and questions permanence and change. Readers are invited to consider how experiences scar us, and to ask how permanent those marks may be.
The new double issue contains the work of twenty-eight poets, twelve works of art by painters, photographers, found-object sculptors, installation and mixed media artists, as well as six written works each in fiction and nonfiction categories.


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In Thailand It Is Night

Winner of the Anita Claire Scharf Award

In Thailand It Is Night reminds us that poetry holds both nostalgia and instructions: we dream of the future while wearing the garments of our fathers. Ira Sukrungruang’s new collection is surprising and clear at every turn. –Stephen Kuusisto

In Ira Sukrungruang’s In Thailand It Is Night, the afterlife is where the streets bustle with the sounds of a backfiring motor and where the surprise of peacocks in the middle of the city fan out their blues and greens despite the strangeness of the paved walkways. Within, Midwest winters are warded off by palpable memories of home while the complexities of love and the world are recollections blossoming from the mind as dogs howl “at the bitten moon.” A vast statue of Buddha houses wintering birds in its ears. Their songs are Sukrunguang’s poems which travel the curved path from the brain into the heart. –Oliver de la Paz

To read the poems in In Thailand It Is Night is to encounter a speaker who knows that poetry lies deeply embedded in the body, and in the litany of breath itself. Sukrungruang has limned an extraordinary collection couched in the broken language of immigration and the mystical language of reincarnation, a book that is as dreamy as it is resolute. Deeply rooted in the landscape, these poems define emotion using the riches of the natural world: finches and cranes and crows, geckos and tree frogs and cardinals and moths—these creatures weave longing, memory, and family into an intricate, lyric-narrative web. “My palms are up,” writes Sukrungruang, and this gesture signifies how open his poetry is to the world, to the simultaneous beauty and suffering it brings.” –Erika Meitner


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The Old Dominion

Winner of the 2012 Tampa Review Prize for Poetry

Jennifer Key takes the title of her first book of poetry from the nickname for the state of Virginia, but she extends the evocative phrase to reflect her complex understanding of domination and dominion in a multi-layered cultural context. The Old Dominion speaks to us with exceptional, insistent images and ideas. Her poems develop into intricate thematic relationships in a gorgeous collection.


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Genius Loci

“Lance Larsen’s fourth collection of poems is as beautifully curated as an art exhibition. Each poem impresses itself of mind and eye and heart like an object brilliantly made and suddenly essential, suddenly neccessary. Wry wit, perfectly etched lines, and a talent for finding poems in unexpected places are hallmarks. His is an important, clarifying voice that you don’t want to miss.” –Kelly Cherry, author of The Retreats of Thought: Poems

“These small, smart treasures dazzle us every time. Deceptively simple observational moments offer themselves up with such inviting clarity that we are, to our benefit, startled by a world turned around in the hand—‘An elevator waiting to be translated into a school bus,’ for example. The poems live their bigger stories to be sure, but imaginative, quiet epiphanies make them feel surprising at every turn.” –Alberto Ríos, author of The Dangerous Shirt


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Tampa Review 43/44

From a timeless Magic Carpet interview with featured cover artist Robert Zakanitch, to the search for roots in Colin Chad Redemer’s “Buried,” to the domestic epic quest of Rebecca Huntman’s “The Dining Room Table,” this latest release touches on mystery, pattern, and culture. Presented by a cast of 70 poets, artists, writers, and editors, this Fall/Winter 2012 double issue of Tampa Review is magic and mythic.


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The Occasions of Paradise

Winner of the Tampa Review Prize for Poetry.

John Blair’s previous poetry collection, The Green Girls, was the 2003 winner of the Lena-Miles Wever Todd Award from Pleiades Press, and his short story collection, American Standard, was the 2002 winner of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize and was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press. He also has two novels from Ballantine/Del Rey, Bright Angel and A Landscape of Darkness, and has poems and stories in Poetry, The New York Quarterly, The Sewanee Review, The Antioch Review, New Letters, and elsewhere. Kevin Prufer writes, “Blair’s poems are musically brilliant, ambitious, and full of gentle urgency. And, despite their sadness and pain, they are also quietly optimistic and elegant.”


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The Peter Pauper Press of Peter And Edna Beilenson

The Peter Pauper Press of Peter and Edna Beilenson by Sean Donnelly & J. B. Dobkin is both a comprehensive bibliography and a history of one of America’s most successful family publishing businesses. It’s the first complete descriptive listing of all the books and publications from the founding of the Peter Pauper Press by Peter Beilenson in 1928 until the last book published under the supervision of Edna Beilenson in 1979. Based on the J. B. Dobkin Peter Pauper Press Collection in the Tampa Book Arts Studio Library, the book has been 12 years in preparation. It includes complete descriptive bibliographic entries for more than 650 Peter Pauper Press editions and ephemera, plus some 357 printing commissions, indexes by author and artist, over 40 pages of color illustrations, and dozens of black and white reproductions of books and photographs.


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The Shape Of Poetry

Peter Meinke is the author of fifteen books of poetry, seven of them in the prestigious Pitt Poetry Series. This book, with drawings by Jeanne Clark Meinke, introduces writers and readers alike to the art and craft of the contemporary poem. The reviewer for The Tampa Tribune describes it well: “This book is so unpretentiously written, so clear in its purpose, and so generously illustrated with poetic selections that it is a delight to read. Anyone, poetic or not, can learn a lot effortlessly in the hands of this gifted teacher and poet.”


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Caladesi Cookbook

Compiled by Myrtle Scharrer Betz’s granddaughters Terry Fortner and Suzanne Thorp

Caladesi Cookbook: Recipes from a Florida Lifetime is pure delight. More than simply a good cookbook, it is a touching story of a lost and vanishing Florida—Myrtle’s granddaughters, Terry Fortner and Suzanne Thorp, have lovingly compiled not simply the recipes, but the memories and stories that make Caladesi Cookbook: Recipes from a Florida Lifetime a culinary and historic treasure.”      – from the foreword by Gary Mormino


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White Shirt

White Shirt is the latest book of poetry from Christopher Buckley, whose work has been described by Emilia Philips in James Dickey Review as about “the crafts not only of poetry, but of memory, politics, philosophy, and probability, that present the whole of one man’s experience, of his time, including his losses and lost bets.”

Buckley, winner of the Tampa Review Prize for Poetry for Rolling the Bones, has been a vital and compelling voice in American poetry for three decades. Philip Levine, writing in Ploughshares, describes his poems as “modest, straightforward, intensely lyrical, and totally accessible . . . This is a humble poetry of great truths and profound emotions that never overstates its concerns for the events both in and above the world.”


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The Rich Mouse • Limited Edition Set

The Rich Mouse limited-edition set is comprised of two volumes, housed together in a handmade slipcase. The first volume is a hand-printed, hand-bound letterpress book that is the first edition of the “The Rich Mouse,” a beast fable featuring two mice as protagonists, written in 1950 by the renowned American woodcut artist J. J. Lankes, who also created two woodcuts to accompany his story. In the letterpress edition we reproduce those two original illustrations for the first time and supplement them with several other complementary and seldom-seen Lankes woodcuts. The book was printed on the 1848 iron hand press once owned by Lankes on fine mouldmade Somerset paper, with handset foundry types designed by Frederic W. Goudy, and hand-bound in hardcover using decorative wood-patterned papers inspired by the Lankes woodcuts, and specifically made for this project.

The letterpress edition is accompanied by “The Rich Mouse Compendium,” a paperback companion volume created to accompany the letterpress book. Set in a new digital version of Goudy’s Village type (the typeface used for printing the letterpress edition), in a paperback binding matching the letterpress hand-bound edition, it includes a full facsimile of the letterpress edition of “The Rich Mouse,” together with an introduction, notes on the manuscript, facsimile manuscript pages, original photographs and background materials on J. J. Lankes as artist and printer, photographs and background materials on Frederic Goudy and his design of the Village type, a J. J. Lankes chronology, and notes on the making of the letterpress edition.

Introduction by Welford D. Taylor; essays by Richard Mathews, Robert Oldham, Will Ransom, and Joshua G. Steward; and a conversation with Parker Agelasto.

The Rich Mouse first-edition set is limited to 150 numbered copies.


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The Elf Poem

This delightful guide to writing and reading poems will appeal to children of all ages with charming drawings by Jeanne Clark Meinke and wise and winking elfish verse by Florida’s Poet Laureate, Peter Meinke. As the Elf advises:

“ . . . when you write, write carefully,
With gaiety and grace,
For when you write a lovely poem
The world’s a better place.”


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Tampa Before The Civil War

Tampa’s story stretches back 175 years to a remote military outpost carved from Florida’s untamed swamps and jungles. Early residents survived intense heat, humidity, tropical diseases, hurricanes, and even Indian attacks to establish Fort Brooke, and later to develop the village they called Tampa. As historian Canter Brown, Jr., observes in his introduction, “Its subsequent history involved fascinating tales of remarkable people engaged in significant events that continue to resonate in our lives today.”

Tampa Before the Civil War provides the best available account of the early years of one of Florida’s most important cities. And while it communicates the dates and facts, including the results of the latest historical research, it does much more than that. This book captures the drama, adventure, and complexity of the early pioneers and soldiers. At its heart are the people who gave the settlement its character and culture: “Those people, much more so than with the populations of many Florida and southern cities, hailed from a broad range of backgrounds, origins, and ethnic roots. Diverse from its beginnings, the city grew to occupy a special place in Florida’s history and in the hearts of its residents.” Here is history you can bring to life and take to heart.


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Space Traveler

In Benjamin S. Grossberg’s third collection, he forges a new mythology, fresh and contemporary in voice and content, as he examines how we live today, seen through the eyes of another being. Playful, insightful, wide in their arc of associations, the poems of Space Traveler are spoken by an alien traveling from star to star, getting a chance to “observe up close” the variety of outer-space phenomena. Along the way, the space traveler launches into contemplation of the range of subjects that humans encounter—-desire, aging, love and separation, and often addressing us, humanity, directly. The space traveler is sometimes exultant, sometimes bereft, but always finds implicit parallels of language and image between his experience traveling alone through space, and our lives in a contemporary world and a contemporary America. But despite its contemporary observations, the space traveler is the natural heir to ancient Odysseus and his fellow seafarers. He, too, navigates a magical landscape in a long search for home.

Maggie Anderson states that, “this book clearly establishes Benjamin Grossberg as one of our most original and consistently interesting poets.”


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Going, Going . . . Almost Gone

This long-awaited companion volume to Citrus, Sawmills, Critters, & Crackers: Life in Early Lutz and Central Pasco County (now out of print) will be treasured by historians and residents alike. The authors have compiled a remarkable collection of unique documents, family photographs, oral histories, significant facts, and illuminating commentaries that preserve a rapidly vanishing Florida pioneer history. Here is a milestone work that traces agriculture and commerce, presents original maps of businesses and historic landmarks, affirms local customs and traditions, and sets new standards for local and regional history in the years to come.


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A Woodcut Manual

The best book ever written about the art of woodcuts is back in print! This handsome new limited edition augments the original J. J. Lankes text with selections from his letters and miscellaneous writings to reveal the rich and multidimensional talents of an American master. With an introduction and commentary by Welford Dunaway Taylor plus dozens of woodcuts and decorations by Lankes, this book leaves no doubt about the truth of Robert Frosts assessment: No man ever dug a better thing out of wood.


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A University Is Born

The University of Tampa from Its Inception to Adolescence, 1929-1936

The Seventy-fifth Anniversary edition of the memoirs of the first president of the University of Tampa. Foreword by Dr. Ronald L. Vaughn. Prologue by Frederick W. Spaulding. Illustrated with photographs.


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A History of Disappearance

This strong and lyrical second book by Marjorie Stelmach, whose first collection won the Marianne Moore Prize, is strong evidence for Mona Van Duyn’s advice that this is a poet to keep an eye on. Poet Eric Pankey has written, “A History of Disappearance works a wonderful alchemy. The ephemeral, that which is always on the verge of disappearing, is recast into a mutable and lasting gold in Marjorie Stelmach’s elegant poems.”

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A Robert Frost Keepsake

A Robert Frost Keepsake

$25.00
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Ybor City: the Making of a Landmark Town

This comprehensive history of a National Historic Landmark town was written by native son Frank Trebín Lastra, born and raised in Ybor City. With 488 pages and 633 photographs and illustrations, this book is sure to be a favorite for years to come. E. J. Salcines, Vice President of the Tampa Historical Society, writes: “Ybor City: The Making of a Landmark Town is a book that everyone interested in Tampa history should read and pass on together with family heirlooms. It is full of treasures of our past.”


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