Featured Publications

Studies in the Fantastic [#12]

Studies in the Fantastic is a journal devoted to the Speculative, Fantastic, and Weird in literature and other arts.

Contents for this special issue on HBO’s Lovecraft Country include “Hippolyta’s Spiritual Awakening Through Spiritual Warfare in Lovecraft Country (2020)” by DeLisa D. Hawkes, “Man’s Fear of a Black Planet: Monstrous Ontological Encounters at Sundown in HBO’s Lovecraft Country” by Joseph Lewis, “Crafting Representation: Deploying Racecraftian Techniques to Critique Gender- and Sexuality- Swapping in HBO’s Lovecraft Country” by Alexandra Stamson, and “The Utilization of Historical Reenactment in Lovecraft Country” by Mychal Reiff-Shanks. This issue also features an interview between Dani Bethea and Monika Negra, as well as John A. Dern’s review of Tony Magistrale and Jessica Slayton’s The Great Illustrators of Edgar Allan Poe.

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Studies in the Fantastic [#11]

Studies in the Fantastic is a journal devoted to the Speculative, Fantastic, and Weird in literature and other arts.

Contents in this issue: “Pigs All the Way Down: Capitalist Realism and Neo-reaction in Thomas Ligotti’s My Work Is Not Yet Done” by Jonathan Newell • “Antiquarianism Underground: The Twentieth-century Alliterative Revival in American Genre Poetry” by Dennis Wilson Wise • “Speaking Horrors: Fantasy, Gender, and Race in Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw and Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon” by Susan Savage Lee • “The Great Unmasking: Adaptation and the Problem of Identity in V for Vendetta” by Kwasu Tembo • Interviews with Justina Ireland by Christina Connor and Sarah Juliet Lauro by Asijit • Review by Jenna Jorgensen

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Tampa Review 61/62 front cover

Tampa Review 61/62

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Studies in the Fantastic [#10]

Studies in the Fantastic is a journal devoted to the Speculative, Fantastic, and Weird in literature and other arts.

Contents in this issue: “Clean Slates, Marked Bodies: Dollhouse, the [Re-]Programming of the Mind, and the Gendered Labor of a Cyborg” by Ksenia Firsova • “The Fragmentation and Recovery of Zdzisław Beksiński” by Joseph Rex Young • “The Dangers of Gothic Sexuality in Crimson Peak and Penny Dreadful” by Amy Montz • “The Great Unmasking: Adaptation and the Problem of Identity in V for Vendetta” by Kwasu Tembo • Reviews by Rachel Cordasco, Ranjodh Singh Dhaliwal, Chera Kee, Jeremy Lakoff, and Steven Shaviro


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My Husband Would

My Husband Would is the fourth full-length collection of poems by Benjamin S. Grossberg, winner of the 2008 Tampa Review Prize and the 2010 Lambda Literary Award. Set at the crossroads of middle age, this book investigates love and family—both the families we are born into and those we create for ourselves. Funny, cinematic, and inventive, the poems recount family lore—a mother’s options, the clouded circumstances of a distant marriage—side by side with the perplexities of contemporary romance. And they are charged with the recent national legalization of same-sex marriage—for many, a radical dawning of possibility, even as it quickly becomes uncontroversial, even unremarkable, in large parts of the country. These poems show us that marriage and family are a learned project, one passed down, to be attempted by each new generation as best it can with the realities at hand. Grossberg surveys the strangeness of what our parents and families teach us about intimacy and what we ourselves learn as we stumble through the landscape of contemporary dating. He finally casts his gaze to future possibility: what we would be, would do, if we could. As Grossberg notes, amid the bustle of our lives, the relationships that help us understand who we are, those losses and discoveries, begin with the simplest impulses, like “the courage/ to go up and say hello.”


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Recent Poetry Titles

My Husband Would

My Husband Would is the fourth full-length collection of poems by Benjamin S. Grossberg, winner of the 2008 Tampa Review Prize and the 2010 Lambda Literary Award. Set at the crossroads of middle age, this book investigates love and family—both the families we are born into and those we create for ourselves. Funny, cinematic, and inventive, the poems recount family lore—a mother’s options, the clouded circumstances of a distant marriage—side by side with the perplexities of contemporary romance. And they are charged with the recent national legalization of same-sex marriage—for many, a radical dawning of possibility, even as it quickly becomes uncontroversial, even unremarkable, in large parts of the country. These poems show us that marriage and family are a learned project, one passed down, to be attempted by each new generation as best it can with the realities at hand. Grossberg surveys the strangeness of what our parents and families teach us about intimacy and what we ourselves learn as we stumble through the landscape of contemporary dating. He finally casts his gaze to future possibility: what we would be, would do, if we could. As Grossberg notes, amid the bustle of our lives, the relationships that help us understand who we are, those losses and discoveries, begin with the simplest impulses, like “the courage/ to go up and say hello.”


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Count Four.

JUST PUBLISHED:  Count Four, winner of the Tampa Review Prize for Poetry, is a book about trying to reconcile the conflicting elements of one’s identity and attempting to understand and articulate the forces that are shaping it. Many of the poems in the collection were written over years Keith Kopka spent as a musician in and around the East Coast punk scene. They try to make sense of how the things and people he loves most in this environment are also what are most likely to destroy him.

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Lays in Summer Lands

Rediscovered after more than a century of neglect, this important 1879 collection of poems by the first African American ever elected to the U.S. Congress will surprise and move new generations of readers. J. Willis Menard grew up in frontier Illinois as a virtual neighbor of Abraham Lincoln, went on to serve in the Lincoln administration, and later became an influential editor, journalist, and political activist in Florida, where he was also elected to the Florida State Legislature.

For the first time in print since the 1879 edition, the poems gain new resonance thanks to accompanying essays and notes by the editorsLarry Eugene Rivers, Richard Mathews, and Canter Brown Jr. Here is a rich and inspiring book brimming with history, intellect, emotion, and literary grace.

 

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Wild Persistence

The poems in Wild Persistence often involve moments when the human and natural worlds intersect: a Sand-hill Crane dancing at the window of a grieving woman, a copperhead snake confronting a gardener, a billboard photo of a missing child slowly being eroded by weather and the passage of time. Although these poems mourn numerous losses, they celebrate the world in which such losses take place, turning for perspective to nature with its cyclical renewals and to the resilience of the human spirit.


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After Earth

Part elegy, part ode, part pastoral, part sci-fi, After Earth looks back through history in order to consider history’s end. Many of the poems are drawn from the concerns of a father for his children, from the impulse to record the Earth, to preserve what’s slipping away, and to heal, if poems can, the bifurcation of nature and civilization. Reveling in the ornate as well as the plain, these poems cultivate astonishment not in the promise of another world, but in the here and now, turning “what is wavering or tattered into permanence,” and praising all they can, as Auden says we must, “for being and for happening.”


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Tasting Like Gravity: Rondeaux and Other Poems

With drawings by Jeanne Clark Meinke

Tasting Like Gravity brings new poems from Florida’s poet laureate, Peter Meinke, with an emphasis on the roundeaux form. The book also includes a short essay on rondeaux by the poet and selected drawings by Jeanne Clark Meinke.


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About Us

The University of Tampa Press, founded in 1952, extends the educational mission of the University of Tampa through the publication of works of scholarship, creativity, and regional interest. Its publications disseminate the fruits of learning to a wide audience of serious readers both within and beyond the academic institution.

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