Studies in the Fantastic Past Issues

lmage of the front cover of Studies in the Fantastic, No. 11.

Contents for this issue include “Pigs All the Way Down: Capitalist Realism and Neo-reaction in Thomas Ligotti’s My Work Is Not Yet Done” by Jonathan Newell, “Antiquarianism Underground: The Twentieth-century Alliterative Revival in American Genre Poetry” by Dennis Wilson Wise, and “Speaking Horrors: Fantasy, Gender, and Race in Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw and Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon” by Susan Savage Lee. This issue also features interviews between Christina Connor and Justina Ireland, and Asijit Datta and Sarah Juliet Lauro, as well as Jeana Jorgensen’s review of Veronica Schanoes’s Burning Girls and Other Stories.

STUDIES IN THE FANTASTIC NO. 11




Image of the front cover of Studies in the Fantastic No. 10.

Contents for this issue include “Clean Slates, Marked Bodies: Dollhouse, the [Re-]Programming of the Mind, and the Gendered Labor of a Cyborg” by Ksenia Firsova • “The Fragmentation and Recovery of Zdzisław Beksiński” by Joseph Rex Young • “The Dangers of Gothic Sexuality in Crimson Peak and Penny Dreadful” by Amy Montz • “The Great Unmasking: Adaptation and the Problem of Identity in V for Vendetta” by Kwasu Tembo • Reviews by Rachel Cordasco, Ranjodh Singh Dhaliwal, Chera Kee, Jeremy Lakoff, and Steven Shaviro

STUDIES IN THE FANTASTIC NO. 10
Image of the front cover of Studies in the Fantastic, No. 9.

Contents for this issue include: “Guest Editors’ Introduction: Weird Temporalities” by Jordan S. Carroll and Alison Sperling • “Xenological Temporalities in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, Lovecraft, and Transgender Experiences” by Adriana Knouf • “What is the Future? Weirdness and Black Time in Sorry to Bother You by Stefanie K. Dunning • “It Might Have Been a Million Years Later: Abyssal Time in William Hope Hodgson’s Weird Fiction” by Timothy S. Murphy • “The Weird Time of Fossils: Irrational Ontologies” by Bethany Doane • Slow Burn: Dreadful Kinship and the Weirdness ofHeteronormativity in It Follows by Tyler Bradway • “A Museum, like a Tomb, is a Whole Theatre of WeirdTemporality: an interview with Sofia Samatar” by Andy Hageman and Sofia Samatar • Reviews by Donald L. Anderson, Katherine Buse, W. Andrew Shephard, and KT Thompson.

STUDIES IN THE FANTASTIC NO. 9




Image of the front cover of Studies in the Fantastic, No. 8.

Essays on the fantastic include “Visualizing Edgar Allan Poe for a New Century: The Early Twentieth-Century Illustrators” by Tony Magistrale; “Holly Black’s THE DARKEST PART OF THE FOREST: Coming of Are in Dialogue with Fairy Tales” by Anelise Farris; “‘People Change as Much as Oceans’: Posthumanism in Neil Gaiman’s THE OCEAN AT THE END OF THE LANE”; and “Urban Fantasy, Interconnectedness, and Ecological Disaster: Reading Anne Bishop’s The Others Series” by Peter Melville. Reviews by Cameron Kunzelman, Sonia Lupher, and Lauren Milici.

STUDIES IN THE FANTASTIC NO. 8




Image of the front cover of Studies in the Fantastic, No. 7.

This special issue of STUDIES IN THE FANTASTIC includes seven essays discussing themes of “Reanimation, Consumption, and Undead Media.” According to Guest Editor Sonia Lupher, the critical perspectives in the volume were triggered by a conference at the University of Pittsburgh where participants “were asked to address the legacy and evolution of the zombie, the undead, and the living dead since 1968.”

STUDIES IN THE FANTASTIC NO. 7




Image of the front cover of Studies in the Fantastic No. 6.

Contents for this issue include: “Transitional Gothic: Hammer’s Gothic Revival and New Horror” by Adam Charles Hart; “Like Clockwork: French Automatons in Life and Literature” by W. Bradley Holley; “The Politics of Precocity in William Gibson’s Bridge Trilogy” by Bryan Yazell; “From the Day After to The 100: Nuclear Weapons on Television” by Steven Holmes; and “Creepy. Atmospheres and Weird Narration in The OA” by Steen Ledet Christiansen.

STUDIES IN THE FANTASTIC NO. 6




Image of the front cover of Studies in the Fantastic, No. 5.

Contents for this issue include: “The Quest for Female Empowerment in William Morris’s Late Prose Romances” by Weronika Łaszkiewicz; “Bad Future: Real-Time Alternate History” by Andrew Frost; and “Love in the Time of the Zombie Contagion: A Girardian-Weilienne Reading of World War Z” by Duncan Reyburn.

STUDIES IN THE FANTASTIC NO. 5




Image of the front cover of Studies in the Fantastic No. 4.

Contents for this issue include: “How to Build a Transsexual Superhuman: Reading Superman’s Emergence Alongside Histories of Eugenic Science and Gender Confirmation Surgeries” by Dan Vena; “How to Hack Lovecraft, Make Friends with His Monsters, and Hijack His Mythos: Reading Biology and Racism in Elizabeth Bear’s “Shoggoths in Bloom”” by Anthony Camara; “Ghana-da’s Tall-Telling: Reframing history, Estranging Science, and Appropriating Indigenous Structures of Feeling” by Anwesha Maity; and “”The Icy Bleakness of Things”: The Aesthetics of Decay in Thomas Ligotti’s “The Bungalow House” by Chris Brawley.

STUDIES IN THE FANTASTIC NO. 4
Image of the front cover of Studies of the Fantastic, No. 3.

This reboot issue of the journal founded by S. T. Joshi is edited by members of the faculty of the University of Tampa. The four contributions are “The Terror of Translation: Ruins of the Translatio in The Castle of Otranto and Vathek” by Micheal Angelo Rumore, “Revolutionary Subjectivity in Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn Trilogy” by Peter Melville, “Rebooting the Damsel: The Transformation of the Damsel Archetype in Spider-Man, Superman, and Batman Films from 1978-2014” by Joseph Walderzak, and “The Emerge(d)nt Weird Tale: A Genre Study” by Todd Spaulding.

STUDIES IN THE FANTASTIC NO. 3
Image of the front cover of Studies in the Fantastic, No. 2.

Contents for this issue include: “Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the New Dark Wave: The Decline and Fall of American Gothic Ethics” by Zachary Z. E. Bennett; “Mariah, My Soul-Mate” by Daniel Pearlman; “The Value of the Supernatural in Fiction” by Lafcadio Hearn; “To Horror” by Robert Southey; and more.

STUDIES IN THE FANTASTIC NO. 2
Image of the front cover of Studies of the Fantastic, No. 1.

Contents in this issue include: “Apparition of a Genre: The Psychical Case Study in the Pre-Modernist British Short Story” by George M. Johnson; “Dark Fantasy and Compulsion in Henrich Marschner’s Der Vampyr” by Robert H. Waugh; and more.

STUDIES IN THE FANTASTIC NO. 1